Download Target Language, Collaborative Learning and Autonomy (Modern by Ernesto Macaro PDF

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By Ernesto Macaro

This quantity explores the relevance that moment language study has for the secondary overseas language lecture room. It analyzes the idea that of educating and studying completely throughout the goal language. this idea is then regarding present pedagogical trends: peer collaboration and learner autonomy. The discussions during the e-book search to notify lecturers, instructor running shoes, researchers and language curriculum planners in any respect degrees.

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Is 'playing the game' perhaps the only way in which learning in such a context could take place? From the teacher's viewpoint it may well appear that pupils will 'play the game' and are prepared to suspend disbelief because: (a) they quite simply like the teacher and want to please him/her; and/or (b) they are, independently of the teacher's efforts, motivated to learn the target language; and/or (c) the teacher can stop them opting out of the game, either through coercion or by keeping their minds off reality for a sufficiently long period of time.

We now need to ask whether, at a theoretical level, increased motivation entails increased learning. Motivation We have examined, in Chapter 1, the National Curriculum's intended purposes of learning a foreign language. What are young learners' beliefs of why a foreign language is important as informed by the Tarclindy data? What motivates them to learn French, for example, and to what extent do teachers'' interpretations of CLT reflect those motivational forces. 1 demonstrates fairly conclusively that learners' goals are instrumental rather than integrative (using the Gardner & Lambert, 1972 terminology).

I would therefore argue that the classroom may well constitute a special socio-linguistic domain. Given the peculiarity of this socio-linguistic domain it is a wonder that the participants 'play the game' at all and abide by the rules (Duff & Polio, 1990:160) most of the time and that language learning does in fact take place. Or is it really such a wonder? Is 'playing the game' perhaps the only way in which learning in such a context could take place? From the teacher's viewpoint it may well appear that pupils will 'play the game' and are prepared to suspend disbelief because: (a) they quite simply like the teacher and want to please him/her; and/or (b) they are, independently of the teacher's efforts, motivated to learn the target language; and/or (c) the teacher can stop them opting out of the game, either through coercion or by keeping their minds off reality for a sufficiently long period of time.

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