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By M. A. Persits, R. A. Ulyanovsky (Ed.), Lev Bobrov (Trans.)

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1. 2 Istiraquiun, April 16, 1919. 4—1824 49 without a popular revolution, but only with the help of Soviet Russia’s armies of liberation. The Barakatullah group in Tashkent evolved leftward. That was due to the influence of the. 1 Sovinterprop gave much attention to the Indian revolu­ tionaries who had arrived in Tashkent. At its opening ses­ sion of December 30, 1919, it examined a message, from Soviet Consul in Kabul N. Z. Bravin who announced the expected arrival in Tashkent of five Indian national revo­ lutionaries who “have expressed a desire to work [in Tur­ kestan] ...

Faced by the sweeping surge of the Indian peo­ ple’s liberation struggle, the British authorities attributed any anti-British act to the scheming of Moscow and, sub­ sequently, of the Comintern, and listed just about every radically-minded national revolutionary as a Bolshevik. In 1918, Indian revolutionary Bharat Das wrote: “For the past ten years, Indian revolutionaries have been hounded as ‘anarchists’. Today, however, ... ”1 When in the spring of 1919, the colonial authorities passed the draconian Rowlatt Bill,2 the wrathful protest it had touched off along with an upsurge of the na­ tional liberation struggle was proclaimed in The Times of March 20, 1919, as part of the “Bolshevik plans to raise revolution in India”.

Masani, The Communist Party of India. A Short History, Dereck Verschoyle, London, 1954, p. 11. 31 out that as time went on, the British authorities in Indiawere more willing to write and talk in official reports and speeches about the supposedly real threat of Bolshevism in India. Faced by the sweeping surge of the Indian peo­ ple’s liberation struggle, the British authorities attributed any anti-British act to the scheming of Moscow and, sub­ sequently, of the Comintern, and listed just about every radically-minded national revolutionary as a Bolshevik.

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